How prepared are americans for public health emergencies? Twelve communities weigh in: U.S. communities have made much progress since 9/11, but gaps in prepared ness still remain

Megan McHugh*, Andrea B. Staiti, Laurie E. Felland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, emergency preparedness has become a top priority in metropolitan areas, and some of these areas have received considerable federal funding to help support improvements. Although much progress has been made, preparedness still varies across communities, with the larger ones exhibiting stronger response capabilities, and some weaknesses are evident, particularly in the areas of communications and workforce education. Experience with other public health emergencies, strong leadership, successful collaboration, and adequate funding contributed to high states of readiness. Important challenges include a shortage of funding, delay in the receipt of federal funding, and staffing shortages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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