How the Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein converts actin polymerization into a motile force

Gregory A. Smith, Daniel A. Portnoy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Acta protein is an essential determinant of pathogenicity that is responsible for the actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes in mammalian cells and cell-free extracts. Acta appears to control at least four functions that collectively lead to actin-based motility: (1) initiation of actin polymerization, (2) polarization of Acta function, (3) transformation of actin polymerization into a motile force and (4) acceleration of movement mediated by the host protein profilin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-276
Number of pages5
JournalTrends in Microbiology
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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