How the SAC gets the axe: Integrating kinetochore microtubule attachments with spindle assembly checkpoint signaling

Shivangi Agarwal, Dileep Varma*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mitosis entails the bona fide segregation of duplicated chromosomes. This process is accomplished by the attachment of kinetochores on chromosomes to microtubules (MTs) of the mitotic spindle. Once the appropriate attachment is achieved, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that delays the premature onset of anaphase needs to be silenced for the cell to proceed to anaphase and cytokinesis. Therefore, while it is imperative to preserve the SAC when kinetochores are unattached, it is of paramount importance that SAC components are removed post kinetochore microtubule (kMT) attachment. Precise knowledge of how kMT attachments trigger the removal of SAC components from kinetochores or how the checkpoint proteins feedback in to the attachment machinery remains elusive. This review aims to describe the recent advances that provide an insight into the interplay of molecular events that coordinate and regulate the SAC activity in response to kMT attachment during cell division.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalBioArchitecture
Volume5
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2014

Keywords

  • KMN
  • Knl1
  • Ndc80
  • checkpoint
  • kinetochore
  • microtubule
  • mitosis
  • spindle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Cell Biology

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