How values shape collaboration between patients with multiple chronic conditions and spousal caregivers

Andrew B.L. Berry, Catherine Lim, Andrea L. Hartzler, Tad Hirsch, Edward H. Wagner, Evette Ludman, James D. Ralston

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) collaborate with spousal caregivers daily to pursue what is most important to their health and well-being. Previous research in human-computer interaction has supported individuals with chronic conditions or their caregivers, but little has supported both as a unit. We conducted a field study with 12 patient-caregiver dyads, all married and living together, to identify partners' values and how they shape collaborative management of MCC. Partners' coinciding values motivated them to empathize with and support each other in the face of challenges related to health and well-being. When their values were asymmetric, they perceived tensions between individual autonomy and their ability to coordinate with their partner. Systems to support partners in this context could help them overcome asymmetric values, but should balance this with support for individual autonomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Subtitle of host publicationExplore, Innovate, Inspire
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages5257-5270
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781450346559
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2017 - Denver, United States
Duration: May 6 2017May 11 2017

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Volume2017-May

Other

Other2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityDenver
Period5/6/175/11/17

Keywords

  • Caregiver
  • Collaboration
  • Coordination
  • Multiple chronic conditions
  • Patient
  • Self-care
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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