Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antigen in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Correlation With Clinical Neurologic Status

Peter Portegies, Leon G. Epstein, Steven Tjong A Hung, Jan Gans, Jaap Goudsmit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type1 (HIV-1) antigen was assayed in paired serum/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen from 85 adults and 58 children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and was compared with clinical neurological status. A quantitative comparison of HIV-1 antigen levels in matched serum and CSF specimens indicated that HIV-1 antigen expression in these compartments is independent and is correlated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia complex in adults and progressive encephalopathy in children. In a longitudinal study (n = 47), 16 patients tested positive for HIV-1 antigen in the CSF before (n = 2) or coincident (n = 14) with neurological deterioration. Six patients who tested positive for HIV-1 antigen in the CSF remained neurologically normal for a median duration of follow-up of 11 months. Six of 25 patients who tested negative for HIV-1 antigen in the CSF, subsequently showed neurological deterioration. These data indicate that HIV-1 antigen expression in the CSF is not useful in predicting neurological deterioration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-264
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

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