Human papillomavirus vaccination training experience among family medicine residents and faculty

Monica L. Kasting, Courtney Elizabeth Lynam Scherr, Karla N. Ali, Paige Lake, Teri L. Malo, Tracy Johns, Richard G. Roetzheim, Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Susan T. Vadaparampil*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Residency training is a pivotal time to establish skills for career-long practices, particularly for challenging skills such as human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine recommendation. Training experience and preferences related to delivering HPV vaccine recommendations were examined for family medicine (FM) residents and faculty. METHODS: Residents (n=28) and faculty (n=19) were identified through a national FM residency directory and recruited from training programs in Florida. Participants completed a phone interview assessing key aspects of HPV vaccine recommendation training. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis. A brief follow-up survey assessing training, practices, and demographics was emailed after the interview. RESULTS: Residents’ training experience with HPV vaccine recommendation varied from none to extensive, and was often self-directed. Variation in training was seen between and within programs. Faculty often noted HPV vaccination training was not standardized and residents lacked instruction about effective communication. Most programs relied on preceptors for training residents but training from preceptors varied widely and was often not standardized within the program. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified a lack of consistent and standardized training for delivering HPV vaccine recommendations. A training curriculum that uses multiple modalities and reflects resident and faculty preferences is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)714-722
Number of pages9
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume49
Issue number9
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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