Human performance in a knob-turning task

N. Gurari*, A. M. Okamura

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knob turning is a common task that should influence the design of human-machine interfaces such as prosthetic arms, teleoperated robots, and virtual environments. This study examines the following metrics for a specified knob rotation: turning strategy, including arm motions used and number of grasps made, time used to complete the motion, and maximum applied forces and torques. The subjects' task was to rotate a one-degree-of freedom haptic knob at least 270 degrees for two angles of attack (hand parallel versus perpendicular to the plane of the knob), three knob sizes, and three motor gains. Results on the initial 260 degrees of rotation show that a more distal arm motion is used for a parallel angle of attack, decreased knob size, and increased gain. Further, a change in the angle of attack affects each metric, with the exception of the maximum z-axis force and the maximum lateral torque. A variation in the knob size modulates each metric, with the exception of the maximum z-axis torque and the maximum lateral force. A modification of the motor gain influences the outcomes of all of the metrics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007
Pages96-101
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 28 2007
Event2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007, WHC'07 - Tsukuba, Japan
Duration: Mar 22 2007Mar 24 2007

Other

Other2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007, WHC'07
CountryJapan
CityTsukuba
Period3/22/073/24/07

Fingerprint

Knobs
Angle of attack
Torque
Prosthetics
Virtual reality
Robots

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software
  • Signal Processing

Cite this

Gurari, N., & Okamura, A. M. (2007). Human performance in a knob-turning task. In Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007 (pp. 96-101). [4145158] https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.71
Gurari, N. ; Okamura, A. M. / Human performance in a knob-turning task. Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007. 2007. pp. 96-101
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Gurari, N & Okamura, AM 2007, Human performance in a knob-turning task. in Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007., 4145158, pp. 96-101, 2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007, WHC'07, Tsukuba, Japan, 3/22/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.71

Human performance in a knob-turning task. / Gurari, N.; Okamura, A. M.

Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007. 2007. p. 96-101 4145158.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Gurari N, Okamura AM. Human performance in a knob-turning task. In Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007. 2007. p. 96-101. 4145158 https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.71