Hypersensitivity pneumonitis resulting from community exposure to Canada goose droppings: When an external environmental antigen becomes an indoor environmental antigen

Carol A. Saltoun, Kathleen E. Harris, Tracy L. Mathisen, Roy Patterson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In the past, hypersensitivity pneumonitis has been attributed to occupational, agricultural, or home environmental exposure. Objective: This report describes the first case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to community exposure to droppings from Canada geese migrating through a suburban environment. Method: Clinical and serologic information was used in making the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Results: Serologic analysis demonstrated precipitating antibodies against goose droppings and against an extract made from washings from a filter taken from the patient's office. These studies also showed that the antigens in the office filter were goose dropping antigens. Conclusion: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis can result from exposure to goose dropping antigens in the community that enter buildings through ventilation systems. This represents a new form of an old disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-86
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Hypersensitivity pneumonitis resulting from community exposure to Canada goose droppings: When an external environmental antigen becomes an indoor environmental antigen'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this