Hypertension Screening of 1 Million Americans: Community Hypertension Evaluation Clinic (CHEC) Program, 1973 Through 1975

Jeremiah Stamler*, Rose Stamler, Wallace F. Riedlinger, George Algera, Richard H. Roberts

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

235 Scopus citations

Abstract

During 1973 through 1975, more than 1 million persons were screened in the nationwide Community Hypertension Evaluation Clinic (CHEC) program at 1,171 sites. While those screened were not from defined populations, findings paralleled those of recent surveys of US population samples. First, CHEC confirmed the scope of the problem of elevated blood pressure in the United States. Of those screened, 247 of 1,000 had a diastolic reading of 90 mm Hg or higher; 116 of 1,000 had a reading of 95 mm Hg or greater. Prevalence of elevated blood pressure rose with age up to age 50 years, was higher in blacks than in whites, and was higher in men than in women. Second, CHEC data confirmed the challenge of undetected, untreated, and uncontrolled hypertension. Previously undetected hypertension was present in 27.7% of hypertensive people, detected but untreated in 10.7%, and treated but uncontrolled in 16.7%—totaling 55.1%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2299-2306
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume235
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 1976

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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