Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase from Trypanosoma cruzi as a target for structure-based inhibitor design: Crystallization and inhibition studies with purine analogs

Ann E. Eakin*, Astrid Guerra, Pamela J. Focia, Jan Torres-Martinez, Sydney P. Craig

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) from Trypanosoma cruzi is a potential target for enzyme structure-based inhibitor design, based on previous studies which indicate that these parasites lack the metabolic enzymes required for de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides. By using a bacterial complement selection system, 59 purine analogs were assayed for their interaction with the HPRTs from T. cruzi and Homo sapiens. Eight compounds were identified from the bacterial assay to have an affinity for the trypanosomal enzyme. Inhibition constants for four of these compounds against purified recombinant trypanosomal and human HPRTs were determined and compared. The results confirm that the recombinant system can be used to identify compounds which have affinity for the trypanosomal HPRT. Furthermore, the results provide evidence for the importance of chemical modifications at positions 6 and 8 of the purine ring in the binding of these compounds to the HPRTs. An accurate three-dimensional structure of the trypanosomal enzyme will greatly enhance our understanding of the interactions between HPRTs and these compounds. Toward this end, crystallization conditions for the trypanosomal HPRT and preliminary analysis of X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 2 Ȧ is reported. These results represent significant progress toward a structure-based approach to the design of inhibitors of the HPRT of trypanosomes with the long-range goal of developing new drugs for the treatment of Chagas' disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1686-1692
Number of pages7
JournalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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