I Keep my Problems to Myself: Negative Social Network Orientation, Social Resources, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer Survivors

Christine Marie Rini*, Yael Symes, Rebecca A. Campo, Lisa Maria Wu, Jane Austin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Cancer survivors treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant rely on their social network for successful recovery. However, some survivors have negative attitudes about using social resources (negative social network orientation) that are critical for their recovery. Purpose: We examined the association between survivors’ social network orientation and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and whether it was mediated by social resources (network size, perceived support, and negative and positive support-related social exchanges). Methods: In a longitudinal study, 255 survivors completed validated measures of social network orientation, HRQoL, and social resources. Hypotheses were tested using path analysis. Results: More negative social network orientation predicted worse HRQoL (p <.001). This association was partially mediated by lower perceived support and more negative social exchanges. Conclusions: Survivors with negative social network orientation may have poorer HRQoL in part due to deficits in several key social resources. Findings highlight a subgroup at risk for poor transplant outcomes and can guide intervention development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-396
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • Cancer survivors
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Network orientation
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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