Identification with ancestral culture is associated with fewer internalizing problems among older Naskapi adolescents

Adrienne Blacklock, Louis A. Schmidt, Stephanie A. Fryberg, Gillian H. Klassen, Johanna Querengesser, Jillian Stewart, Colin Andrew Campbell, Heidi Flores, Ashley Reynolds, Curtis Tootoosis, Jacob A. Burack*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The manifestations of externalizing and internalizing behaviors among minority adolescents might best be understood by examining their relation to culturally specific factors, such as cultural identity, as well as to factors that seem to be relevant across cultures, such as age and gender. In this study, we examined the roles of age and gender in moderating the relation between self-reported cultural identity and externalizing and internalizing problems and the interaction between Indigenous and Mainstream cultural identity in relation to problematic behaviors. The participants included 61 students (32 female) with a mean age of 14.5 years (SD = 1.69) from a Naskapi reserve in Quebec, Canada. Age moderated the relation between identification with Indigenous culture and internalizing symptomatology. Indigenous and Mainstream cultural identity did not interact in predicting internalizing or externalizing problems. Consistent with the available evidence regarding the centrality of identity in adolescent development, the magnitude of the inverse relation between identification with Indigenous culture and number of clinical internalizing symptoms appears to increase in significance later in adolescence. The lack of an interaction between Indigenous and Mainstream cultural identity in relation to internalizing and externalizing problems suggests that it is the need to consider both cultures individually without the assumption that one negates the other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-331
Number of pages11
Journaltranscultural psychiatry
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Keywords

  • Cultural identity
  • First Nations
  • Internalizing and externalizing behaviors
  • Youth mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Identification with ancestral culture is associated with fewer internalizing problems among older Naskapi adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this