Identifying patients at risk for significant versus clinically insignificant postoperative prostate-specific antigen failure

Anthony V. D'Amico*, Ming Hui Chen, Kimberly A. Roehl, William J. Catalona

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: We evaluated whether men at risk for significant versus clinically insignificant prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy could be identified using information available at diagnosis. Patients and Methods: A prospective prostate cancer screening study that enrolled, diagnosed, and treated 1,011 men with radical prostatectomy at Barnes-Jewish Hospital (St Louis, MO) from January 1, 1989, to June 1, 2002, for localized prostate cancer formed the study cohort. Preoperative predictors of a postoperative PSA doubling time (DT) of less than 3 months and more than 12 months or no PSA failure were identified using logistic regression. Results: A preoperative PSA velocity more than 2.0 ng/mL/yr (P = .001) and biopsy Gleason score 7 (P = .006) or 8 to 10 (P = .003) were significantly associated with having a postoperative PSA DT less than 3 months. A PSA level less than 10 ng/mL (P = .005), a nonpalpable cancer (P = .001) with a Gleason score ≤ 6 (P = .0002), and a preoperative PSA increase that did not exceed 0.5 ng/mL/yr (P = .03) were significantly associated with a postoperative PSA DT of at least 12 months or no PSA failure. Most men with these preoperative characteristics and a postoperative PSA DT of 12 months or more had a persistent postoperative PSA level of at least 0.2 ng/mL that did not exceed 0.25 ng/mL after a median follow-up of 3.6 years. Conclusion: A postoperative PSA DT less than 3 months is associated with a preoperative PSA velocity more than 2.0 ng/mL/yr and high-grade disease. Select men with a postoperative PSA DT more than 12 months may not require salvage radiation therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4975-4979
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume23
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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