Identifying the onset of increased cognitive load using event-related potentials in electroencephalography

Margaret M. Swerdloff*, Levi J. Hargrove

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Assessing cognitive load may be useful in a variety of applications, especially in identifying the onset of high cognitive load. However, current methods do not exist that can pinpoint such an event. We recorded EEG from participants while they completed auditory oddball paradigm and Stroop tasks. To determine the time at which a change in cognitive load could be detected, we applied auditory tones at four time points before and after the onset of an incongruent Stroop trial: (1) 100 ms prior to the Stroop onset, (2) 100 ms post Stroop onset, (3) 300 ms post Stroop onset, and (4) 450 ms post Stroop onset. Event-related potential results suggest that cognitive load was highest at time points after 100 ms post Stroop onset. This work provides a method for identifying an increase in cognitive load, which could be an important diagnostic tool for device development and tuning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2021 10th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2021
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages909-912
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781728143378
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2021
Event10th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2021 - Virtual, Online, Italy
Duration: May 4 2021May 6 2021

Publication series

NameInternational IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER
Volume2021-May
ISSN (Print)1948-3546
ISSN (Electronic)1948-3554

Conference

Conference10th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2021
Country/TerritoryItaly
CityVirtual, Online
Period5/4/215/6/21

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Mechanical Engineering

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