If low-income blacks are given a chance to live in white neighborhoods, will they stay? Examining mobility patterns in a quasi-experimental program with administrative data

Stefanie DeLuca*, James E. Rosenbaum

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

After describing the distinctive features of various policy models of residential mobility, we examine the long-term outcomes of the Gautreaux program. Administrative records provide baseline characteristics for all participants, and we located recent addresses for over 99 percent of a random sample of 1,506 participants an average of 14 years after original placement. Although 84 percent of the families made subsequent moves, the racial composition of the current address is strongly related to program placement, even among movers, and after family attributes and premove neighborhood characteristics are controlled. Combined with our prior findings, these results suggest that residential mobility has an enduring, long-term impact on the residential locations of these families. Contrary to models that assume that families' enduring preferences will quickly erase these moves, these results suggest the need for further research to consider whether mobility alters preferences or structural barriers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-345
Number of pages41
JournalHousing Policy Debate
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Keywords

  • Families and children
  • Mobility
  • Neighborhood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'If low-income blacks are given a chance to live in white neighborhoods, will they stay? Examining mobility patterns in a quasi-experimental program with administrative data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this