Immigrant adolescents’ roots and dreams: Perceived mismatches between ethnic identities and aspirational selves predict engagement

Régine Debrosse*, Mesmin Destin, Maya Rossignac-Milon, Donald Taylor, Leoandra Onnie Rogers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Immigrant adolescents are generally more ambitious but not as likely to achieve their career/occupational aspirations as their peers. The present study draws on self-discrepancy and social identity literatures to define and explore the role of mismatches between ethnic and aspiration-related ideal selves. In two samples recruited in Canada, 73% of immigrant adolescents aspired to a university-bound career (e.g., physician, engineer). As expected, adolescents reporting larger ethnic/ideal self-discrepancies were less engaged towards their aspiration (Sample 1, n = 73) and viewed school less favorably (Sample 2, n = 125). The present analyses suggest that actual/ideal self-discrepancies mediate these associations, thus extending prior findings and highlighting the role of self-discrepancies in immigrant adolescents’ experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalSelf and Identity
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2020

Keywords

  • Self-discrepancies
  • adolescence
  • aspiration
  • ethnic identity
  • immigration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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