Immigrant perceptions of discrimination in health care: The California health interview survey 2003

Diane S. Lauderdale*, Ming Wen, Elizabeth A. Jacobs, Namratha R. Kandula

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: U.S. healthcare disparities may be in part the result of differential experiences of discrimination in health care. Previous research about discrimination has focused on race/ethnicity. Because immigrants are clustered in certain racial and ethnic groups, failure to consider immigration status could distort race/ethnicity effects. Objectives: We examined whether foreign-born persons are more likely to report discrimination in healthcare than U.S.-born persons in the same race/ethnic group, whether the immigration effect varies by race/ethnicity, and whether the immigration effect is "explained" by sociodemographic factors. Research Design: The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2003 California Health Interview Survey consisting of 42,044 adult respondents. Logistic regression models use replicate weights to adjust for nonresponse and complex survey design. Outcome Measure: The outcome measure of this study was respondent reports that there was a time when they would have gotten better medical care if they had belonged to a different race or ethnic group. Results: Seven percent of blacks and Latinos and 4% of Asians reported healthcare discrimination within the past 5 years. Immigrants were more likely to report discrimination than U.S.-born persons adjusting for race/ethnicity. For Asians, only the foreign-born were more likely than whites to report discrimination. For Latinos, increased perceptions of discrimination were attributable to sociodemographic factors for the U.S.-born but not for the foreign-born. Speaking a language other than English at home increased discrimination reports regardless of birthplace; private insurance was protective for the U.S.-born only. Conclusions: Immigration status should be included in studies of healthcare disparities because nativity is a key determinant of discrimination experiences for Asians and Latinos.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)914-920
Number of pages7
JournalMedical care
Volume44
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Health disparities
  • Immigrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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