Immigrant status and cardiovascular risk over time: Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Félice Lê-Scherban*, Sandra S. Albrecht, Alain Bertoni, Namratha Kandula, Neil Mehta, Ana V. Diez Roux

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Despite cross-sectional evidence that foreign-born United States (US) residents often have better health than US-born residents of similar race and/or ethnicity, we know little about overall cardiovascular risk progression over time among immigrants as they age in the US. Methods: Using longitudinal data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis on 6446 adults aged 45-84 years at baseline, we examined how nativity and length of US residence related to change in cardiovascular health (CVH) and cardiovascular event incidence over 11-year follow-up. CVH was measured using the American Heart Association's CVH measure (range, 0-14; higher is better). Results: Immigrants, particularly those with shorter US residence, had better baseline CVH and lower cardiovascular event incidence than the US born. Baseline CVH scores ranged from 8.67 (8.42-8.92) among immigrants living in the US less than 10 years to 7.86 (7.76-7.97) among the US born. However, recent immigrants experienced the largest CVH declines over time: 10-year declines ranged from -1.04 (-1.27 to -0.80) among immigrants living in the US less than 10 years at baseline to -0.47 (-0.52 to -0.42) among the US born. Conclusions: Public health prevention efforts targeting new immigrants may help slow the deterioration of CVH and reduce future cardiovascular risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-435.e1
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular events
  • Cardiovascular risk factors
  • Cohort studies
  • Immigrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Immigrant status and cardiovascular risk over time: Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this