Impact of increasing prevalence of minimally invasive prostatectomy on open prostatectomy observed in the national inpatient sample and national surgical quality improvement program

Matthias Dominikus Hofer*, Joshua J Meeks, John Cashy, Shilajit D Kundu, Lee C. Zhao

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Laparoscopic and especially robot-assisted minimally invasive prostatectomy (MIP) has increased in popularity over the past decade. We analyzed how the increasing prevalence of MIP has affected the outcomes of MIP and open radical prostatectomy (RRP). Methods: In the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 23,473 patients undergoing MIP and 118,266 undergoing RRP between 2002 and 2008 are reported. We analyzed length of stay (LOS), hospital charges (THC), complication rates (CR), and socioeconomic characteristics. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to identify complication rates (RRP n=666, and MIP n=2205). Results: The proportion of MIP increased from 1.4% in 2002 to 29.5% in 2008. Mean LOS decreased for MIP (2.4 days in 2002, 1.6 days in 2008) and RRP (3.1 days in 2002, 2.1 days in 2008). Mean THC for MIP decreased ($46k in 2002, $34k in 2008) and increased for RRP ($18k in 2002, $32k in 2008). After 2005, overall CRs of MIP were lower than for RRP. High-volume centers reported lower CRs for both procedures. MIP was associated with fewer transfusions and wound complications. Men living in ZIP codes with the top quartile of yearly mean household income were more likely to undergo MIP than RRP (P<0.001). Although there were more white patients receiving MIP and black or Hispanic patients more frequently underwent RRP, there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Increasing use of MIP led to decreased hospital stay for all patients, increase charges for RRP, and decreased CRs for both MIP and RRP. In recent years, MIP was associated with fewer complications. Charges for RRP have increased over time to approach those for MIP, and patients with increased socio-economic status were more likely to undergo MIP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-107
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Prostatectomy
Quality Improvement
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Dronabinol
Hospital Charges
Hispanic Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

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title = "Impact of increasing prevalence of minimally invasive prostatectomy on open prostatectomy observed in the national inpatient sample and national surgical quality improvement program",
abstract = "Background and Purpose: Laparoscopic and especially robot-assisted minimally invasive prostatectomy (MIP) has increased in popularity over the past decade. We analyzed how the increasing prevalence of MIP has affected the outcomes of MIP and open radical prostatectomy (RRP). Methods: In the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 23,473 patients undergoing MIP and 118,266 undergoing RRP between 2002 and 2008 are reported. We analyzed length of stay (LOS), hospital charges (THC), complication rates (CR), and socioeconomic characteristics. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to identify complication rates (RRP n=666, and MIP n=2205). Results: The proportion of MIP increased from 1.4{\%} in 2002 to 29.5{\%} in 2008. Mean LOS decreased for MIP (2.4 days in 2002, 1.6 days in 2008) and RRP (3.1 days in 2002, 2.1 days in 2008). Mean THC for MIP decreased ($46k in 2002, $34k in 2008) and increased for RRP ($18k in 2002, $32k in 2008). After 2005, overall CRs of MIP were lower than for RRP. High-volume centers reported lower CRs for both procedures. MIP was associated with fewer transfusions and wound complications. Men living in ZIP codes with the top quartile of yearly mean household income were more likely to undergo MIP than RRP (P<0.001). Although there were more white patients receiving MIP and black or Hispanic patients more frequently underwent RRP, there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Increasing use of MIP led to decreased hospital stay for all patients, increase charges for RRP, and decreased CRs for both MIP and RRP. In recent years, MIP was associated with fewer complications. Charges for RRP have increased over time to approach those for MIP, and patients with increased socio-economic status were more likely to undergo MIP.",
author = "Hofer, {Matthias Dominikus} and Meeks, {Joshua J} and John Cashy and Kundu, {Shilajit D} and Zhao, {Lee C.}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1089/end.2012.0315",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "102--107",
journal = "Journal of Endourology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of increasing prevalence of minimally invasive prostatectomy on open prostatectomy observed in the national inpatient sample and national surgical quality improvement program

AU - Hofer, Matthias Dominikus

AU - Meeks, Joshua J

AU - Cashy, John

AU - Kundu, Shilajit D

AU - Zhao, Lee C.

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Background and Purpose: Laparoscopic and especially robot-assisted minimally invasive prostatectomy (MIP) has increased in popularity over the past decade. We analyzed how the increasing prevalence of MIP has affected the outcomes of MIP and open radical prostatectomy (RRP). Methods: In the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 23,473 patients undergoing MIP and 118,266 undergoing RRP between 2002 and 2008 are reported. We analyzed length of stay (LOS), hospital charges (THC), complication rates (CR), and socioeconomic characteristics. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to identify complication rates (RRP n=666, and MIP n=2205). Results: The proportion of MIP increased from 1.4% in 2002 to 29.5% in 2008. Mean LOS decreased for MIP (2.4 days in 2002, 1.6 days in 2008) and RRP (3.1 days in 2002, 2.1 days in 2008). Mean THC for MIP decreased ($46k in 2002, $34k in 2008) and increased for RRP ($18k in 2002, $32k in 2008). After 2005, overall CRs of MIP were lower than for RRP. High-volume centers reported lower CRs for both procedures. MIP was associated with fewer transfusions and wound complications. Men living in ZIP codes with the top quartile of yearly mean household income were more likely to undergo MIP than RRP (P<0.001). Although there were more white patients receiving MIP and black or Hispanic patients more frequently underwent RRP, there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Increasing use of MIP led to decreased hospital stay for all patients, increase charges for RRP, and decreased CRs for both MIP and RRP. In recent years, MIP was associated with fewer complications. Charges for RRP have increased over time to approach those for MIP, and patients with increased socio-economic status were more likely to undergo MIP.

AB - Background and Purpose: Laparoscopic and especially robot-assisted minimally invasive prostatectomy (MIP) has increased in popularity over the past decade. We analyzed how the increasing prevalence of MIP has affected the outcomes of MIP and open radical prostatectomy (RRP). Methods: In the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 23,473 patients undergoing MIP and 118,266 undergoing RRP between 2002 and 2008 are reported. We analyzed length of stay (LOS), hospital charges (THC), complication rates (CR), and socioeconomic characteristics. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to identify complication rates (RRP n=666, and MIP n=2205). Results: The proportion of MIP increased from 1.4% in 2002 to 29.5% in 2008. Mean LOS decreased for MIP (2.4 days in 2002, 1.6 days in 2008) and RRP (3.1 days in 2002, 2.1 days in 2008). Mean THC for MIP decreased ($46k in 2002, $34k in 2008) and increased for RRP ($18k in 2002, $32k in 2008). After 2005, overall CRs of MIP were lower than for RRP. High-volume centers reported lower CRs for both procedures. MIP was associated with fewer transfusions and wound complications. Men living in ZIP codes with the top quartile of yearly mean household income were more likely to undergo MIP than RRP (P<0.001). Although there were more white patients receiving MIP and black or Hispanic patients more frequently underwent RRP, there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusions: Increasing use of MIP led to decreased hospital stay for all patients, increase charges for RRP, and decreased CRs for both MIP and RRP. In recent years, MIP was associated with fewer complications. Charges for RRP have increased over time to approach those for MIP, and patients with increased socio-economic status were more likely to undergo MIP.

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DO - 10.1089/end.2012.0315

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