Impact of joint impairment on disability-specific domains at four years

Dorothy D. Dunlop*, Susan L. Hughes, Perry Edelman, Ruth M. Singer, Rowland W. Chang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the longitudinal impact of joint impairment on overall disability and crossing domain-specific thresholds for physical activity, mobility, dexterity, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and activities of daily living (ADL) that are associated with use of long-term care. This 4-year longitudinal study observed 484 persons older than age 60. Logistic regression assessed the contribution of demographics, psychological mediators, lowers- and upper- extremity joint impairment, and comorbities to increased domain-specific self-reported disability above a threshold associated with use of long-term care. Lower- extremity joint impairment and age predicted crossing thresholds by year 4 in physical activity, mobility, IADL, and ADL disability that were associated with use of long-term care. Lower-extremity joint impairment is a strong risk factor for future disability that is associated with use of long- term care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1261
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume51
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Keywords

  • ADL
  • Aging
  • Arthritis
  • Disability
  • IADL
  • Joint impairment
  • Longitudinal data

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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