Impact of resident involvement on orthopaedic surgery outcomes: An analysis of 30,628 patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database

Adam I. Edelstein, Francis C. Lovecchio, Sujata Saha, Wellington K. Hsu, John Y.S. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Operative procedural training is a key component of orthopaedic surgery residency. The influence of intraoperative resident participation on the outcomes of surgery has not been studied extensively using large, populationbased databases. Methods: We identified 30,628 patients who underwent orthopaedic procedures from the 2011 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Outcomes as measured by perioperative complications, readmission rates, and mortality within thirty days were compared for cases with and without intraoperative resident involvement. Results: Logistic regression with propensity score analysis revealed that intraoperative resident participation was associated with decreased rates of overall complications (odds ratio, 0.717 [95% confidence interval, 0.657 to 0.782]), medical complications (odds ratio, 0.723 [95% confidence interval, 0.661 to 0.790]), and mortality (odds ratio, 0.638 [95% confidence interval, 0.427 to 0.951]). Resident presence in the operating room was not predictive of wound complications (odds ratio, 0.831 [95% confidence interval, 0.656 to 1.053]), readmission (odds ratio, 0.962 [95% confidence interval, 0.830 to 1.116]), or reoperation (odds ratio, 0.938 [95% confidence interval, 0.758 to 1.161]). A second analysis by propensity score stratification into quintiles grouped by similar probability of intraoperative resident presence showed resident involvement to correlate with decreased rates of overall and medical complications in three quintiles, but increased rates of overall and medical complications in one quintile. All other outcomes were equivalent across quintiles. Conclusions: Orthopaedic resident involvement during surgical procedures is associated with lower risk of perioperative complications and mortality in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. The results support resident participation in the operative care of orthopaedic patients. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e131(1)
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume
Volume96
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 6 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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