Implementing screening for Lynch syndrome among patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer: Summary of a public health/clinical collaborative meeting

Cecelia A. Bellcross*, Sara R. Bedrosian, Elvan Daniels, Debra Duquette, Heather Hampel, Kory Jasperson, Djenaba A. Joseph, Celia Kaye, Ira Lubin, Laurence J. Meyer, Michele Reyes, Maren T. Scheuner, Sheri D. Schully, Leigha Senter, Sherri L. Stewart, Jeanette St. Pierre, Judith Westman, Paul Wise, Vincent W. Yang, Muin J. Khoury

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of inherited colorectal cancer, accounting for approximately 3% of all colorectal cancer cases in the United States. In 2009, an evidence-based review process conducted by the independent Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Working Group resulted in a recommendation to offer genetic testing for Lynch syndrome to all individuals with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer, with the intent of reducing morbidity and mortality in family members. To explore issues surrounding implementation of this recommendation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened a multidisciplinary working group meeting in September 2010. This article reviews background information regarding screening for Lynch syndrome and summarizes existing clinical paradigms, potential implementation strategies, and conclusions which emerged from the meeting. It was recognized that widespread implementation will present substantial challenges, and additional data from pilot studies will be needed. However, evidence of feasibility and population health benefits and the advantages of considering a public health approach were acknowledged. Lynch syndrome can potentially serve as a model to facilitate the development and implementation of population-level programs for evidence-based genomic medicine applications involving follow-up testing of at-risk relatives. Such endeavors will require multilevel and multidisciplinary approaches building on collaborative public health and clinical partnerships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-162
Number of pages11
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • HNPCC
  • Lynch syndrome
  • colorectal cancer
  • genetic screening
  • genetic testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

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