Implicit recognition based on lateralized perceptual fluency

Iliana M. Vargas, Joel L. Voss, Ken A. Paller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In some circumstances, accurate recognition of repeated images in an explicit memory test is driven by implicit memory. We propose that this "implicit recognition" results from perceptual fluency that influences responding without awareness of memory retrieval. Here we examined whether recognition would vary if images appeared in the same or different visual hemifield during learning and testing. Kaleidoscope images were briefly presented left or right of fixation during divided-attention encoding. Presentation in the same visual hemifield at test produced higher recognition accuracy than presentation in the opposite visual hemifield, but only for guess responses. These correct guesses likely reflect a contribution from implicit recognition, given that when the stimulated visual hemifield was the same at study and test, recognition accuracy was higher for guess responses than for responses with any level of confidence. The dramatic difference in guessing accuracy as a function of lateralized perceptual overlap between study and test suggests that implicit recognition arises from memory storage in visual cortical networks that mediate repetition-induced fluency increments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-32
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Implicit memory
  • Perceptual priming
  • Recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Implicit recognition based on lateralized perceptual fluency'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this