Improved overall survival of melanoma of the head and neck treated with Mohs micrographic surgery versus wide local excision

Jamie Hanson*, Addison Demer, Walter Liszewski, Neal Foman, Ian Maher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Optimal surgical management for melanoma of the head and neck remains controversial. Objective: Assess outcomes for melanomas of the head and neck treated with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) versus wide local excision (WLE) from the National Cancer Database. Methods: Head and neck melanoma data from the National Cancer Database from years 2004-2015 were analyzed. Results: In total, 50,397 cases of head and neck melanoma were reviewed; 3510 (7%) were treated with MMS and 46,887 (93%) with WLE. After controlling for potential confounding variables, patients treated with MMS were more likely than patients treated with WLE to survive after 5 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.181, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.083-1.288; P <.001). Factors associated with a statistically significant survival disadvantage included male sex (HR 1.287, 95% CI 1.242-1.357; P = 0), tumor ulceration (HR 1.687, 95% CI 1.616-1.760; P = 0), and positive surgical margins (HR 1.395, 95% CI 1.306-1.490; P = 0). Patient survival was inversely proportional to tumor Breslow depth. Limitations: Database study, limited number of MMS treated melanomas. Conclusion: MMS is a valid treatment option for melanoma of the head and neck; National Cancer Database data suggests that MMS might confer a survival benefit over WLE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mohs micrographic surgery
  • NCDB
  • melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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