In and out of harm's way: Violent victimization and the social capital of fictive street families

Bill McCarthy*, John Hagan, Monica J. Martin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

Homeless youth establish a variety of relationships with people they meet on the street. These associations generate different levels of the intangible resources of trust, commitment, and reciprocity that contribute to a person's social capital. We argue that the relationships homeless youth describe as "street families" resemble the fictive kin common among people who have limited resources, and that these relationships are a greater source of social capital than are other associations. Social capital may improve access to many valued outcomes, including protections. Regression analyses of violent victimization support our argument, demonstrating that fictive street families keep youth out of harm's way more than do other street associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-866
Number of pages36
JournalCriminology
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002

Keywords

  • Deviant peers
  • Fictive families
  • Homeless youth
  • Social capital
  • Violent victimization and offending

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'In and out of harm's way: Violent victimization and the social capital of fictive street families'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this