In vitro effect of volume expansion on rectal gland function. II. Hemodynamic changes

R. J. Solomon, M. Taylor, R. Rosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intravascular volume expansion causes a 300% increase in the rate of fluid secretion from, and blood flow to, the in vivo rectal gland of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias. Similar increases are also observed in explanted rectal glands perfused through a catheter from the dorsal aorta of a volume-expanded dogfish. Stimulation of rectal gland secretion by volume expansion is not associated with a change in the ratio of chloride secreted to oxygen consumed by the rectal gland and the oxygen extraction ratio, suggesting that an increase in blood flow is necessary to support the increased rat of chloride secretion. Perfusion of the explanted gland with bumetanide (10-4 M) completely inhibits the secretion response to volume expansion but does not prevent the increase in blood flow. Bumetanide also inhibits dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate- and theophylline-induced increases in chloride secretion but does not inhibit the hyperemic response. Somatostatin inhibits the secrectory response of the explanted gland to volume expansion but does not prevent the increase in blood flow. Although an increase in blood flow is necessary to support the increased energy requirement of enhanced transport, the secretory response and the increase in blood flow appear to be independently regulated and mediated, at least in part, by humoral factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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