Incidence and progression of coronary artery calcium in south asians compared with 4 race/ethnic groups

Alka M. Kanaya, Eric Vittinghoff, Feng Lin, Namratha R Kandula, David Herrington, Kiang Liu, Michael Blaha, Matthew J. Budoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background South Asians have a relatively high prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) compared with other race/ethnic groups. We determined CAC incidence and progression among South Asians, and compared them with 4 race/ethnic groups. Methods and Results Data from the MASALA (Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America) study were used to calculate CACincidence and progression rates and any CAC change. Data from the MESA (Multi‐Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) were used to compare the CAC incidence and progression rates. A total of 698 South Asians had repeat CAC measurements after 4.8±0.8 years. Among those with no CAC at baseline, the age‐adjusted CACincidence was 8.8% (95% CI, 6.8–10.8%) in men and 3.6% (2.5–4.8%) in women. The median annual CAC progression was 26 (interquartile range, 11–62) for men and 13 (interquartile range, 4–34) for women. Compared with MESA, age‐adjusted CACincidence was similar in South Asian men compared with white, black, and Latino men, but significantly higher than Chinese men (11.1% versus 5.7%, P=0.008). After adjusting for age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and statin medication use, Chinese, black, and Latino men had significantly less CAC change compared with South Asian men, but there were no differences between South Asian and white men. There was no difference in CAC incidence or progression between South Asian women and women in MESA. Conclusions South Asian men had greater CAC change than Chinese, black, and Latino men but similar change to that of whites after adjusting for traditional risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere011053
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Ethnic Groups
Coronary Vessels
Calcium
Incidence
Atherosclerosis
Hispanic Americans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Diabetes Mellitus
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Coronary artery calcium
  • Epidemiology
  • Ethnic differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Kanaya, Alka M. ; Vittinghoff, Eric ; Lin, Feng ; Kandula, Namratha R ; Herrington, David ; Liu, Kiang ; Blaha, Michael ; Budoff, Matthew J. / Incidence and progression of coronary artery calcium in south asians compared with 4 race/ethnic groups. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 2.
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abstract = "Background South Asians have a relatively high prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) compared with other race/ethnic groups. We determined CAC incidence and progression among South Asians, and compared them with 4 race/ethnic groups. Methods and Results Data from the MASALA (Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America) study were used to calculate CACincidence and progression rates and any CAC change. Data from the MESA (Multi‐Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) were used to compare the CAC incidence and progression rates. A total of 698 South Asians had repeat CAC measurements after 4.8±0.8 years. Among those with no CAC at baseline, the age‐adjusted CACincidence was 8.8{\%} (95{\%} CI, 6.8–10.8{\%}) in men and 3.6{\%} (2.5–4.8{\%}) in women. The median annual CAC progression was 26 (interquartile range, 11–62) for men and 13 (interquartile range, 4–34) for women. Compared with MESA, age‐adjusted CACincidence was similar in South Asian men compared with white, black, and Latino men, but significantly higher than Chinese men (11.1{\%} versus 5.7{\%}, P=0.008). After adjusting for age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and statin medication use, Chinese, black, and Latino men had significantly less CAC change compared with South Asian men, but there were no differences between South Asian and white men. There was no difference in CAC incidence or progression between South Asian women and women in MESA. Conclusions South Asian men had greater CAC change than Chinese, black, and Latino men but similar change to that of whites after adjusting for traditional risk factors.",
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Incidence and progression of coronary artery calcium in south asians compared with 4 race/ethnic groups. / Kanaya, Alka M.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Lin, Feng; Kandula, Namratha R; Herrington, David; Liu, Kiang; Blaha, Michael; Budoff, Matthew J.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 8, No. 2, e011053, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidence and progression of coronary artery calcium in south asians compared with 4 race/ethnic groups

AU - Kanaya, Alka M.

AU - Vittinghoff, Eric

AU - Lin, Feng

AU - Kandula, Namratha R

AU - Herrington, David

AU - Liu, Kiang

AU - Blaha, Michael

AU - Budoff, Matthew J.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background South Asians have a relatively high prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) compared with other race/ethnic groups. We determined CAC incidence and progression among South Asians, and compared them with 4 race/ethnic groups. Methods and Results Data from the MASALA (Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America) study were used to calculate CACincidence and progression rates and any CAC change. Data from the MESA (Multi‐Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) were used to compare the CAC incidence and progression rates. A total of 698 South Asians had repeat CAC measurements after 4.8±0.8 years. Among those with no CAC at baseline, the age‐adjusted CACincidence was 8.8% (95% CI, 6.8–10.8%) in men and 3.6% (2.5–4.8%) in women. The median annual CAC progression was 26 (interquartile range, 11–62) for men and 13 (interquartile range, 4–34) for women. Compared with MESA, age‐adjusted CACincidence was similar in South Asian men compared with white, black, and Latino men, but significantly higher than Chinese men (11.1% versus 5.7%, P=0.008). After adjusting for age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and statin medication use, Chinese, black, and Latino men had significantly less CAC change compared with South Asian men, but there were no differences between South Asian and white men. There was no difference in CAC incidence or progression between South Asian women and women in MESA. Conclusions South Asian men had greater CAC change than Chinese, black, and Latino men but similar change to that of whites after adjusting for traditional risk factors.

AB - Background South Asians have a relatively high prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) compared with other race/ethnic groups. We determined CAC incidence and progression among South Asians, and compared them with 4 race/ethnic groups. Methods and Results Data from the MASALA (Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America) study were used to calculate CACincidence and progression rates and any CAC change. Data from the MESA (Multi‐Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) were used to compare the CAC incidence and progression rates. A total of 698 South Asians had repeat CAC measurements after 4.8±0.8 years. Among those with no CAC at baseline, the age‐adjusted CACincidence was 8.8% (95% CI, 6.8–10.8%) in men and 3.6% (2.5–4.8%) in women. The median annual CAC progression was 26 (interquartile range, 11–62) for men and 13 (interquartile range, 4–34) for women. Compared with MESA, age‐adjusted CACincidence was similar in South Asian men compared with white, black, and Latino men, but significantly higher than Chinese men (11.1% versus 5.7%, P=0.008). After adjusting for age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and statin medication use, Chinese, black, and Latino men had significantly less CAC change compared with South Asian men, but there were no differences between South Asian and white men. There was no difference in CAC incidence or progression between South Asian women and women in MESA. Conclusions South Asian men had greater CAC change than Chinese, black, and Latino men but similar change to that of whites after adjusting for traditional risk factors.

KW - Coronary artery calcium

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Ethnic differences

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U2 - 10.1161/JAHA.118.011053

DO - 10.1161/JAHA.118.011053

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Journal of the American Heart Association

JF - Journal of the American Heart Association

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