Independent associations between personality traits and clinical characteristics of depression.

E. Jenna Robison*, Stewart A Shankman, Brian R. McFarland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few studies have examined age of onset and chronicity of depression in the same subject sample. The present study sought to determine whether personality traits related to early onset depression were different from those related to chronic depression. We tested the associations between personality self-reports and clinical characteristics of depression by conducting multiple and logistic regression analyses to determine whether personality uniquely predicted clinical characteristics and whether clinical characteristics uniquely predicted personality, after adjusting for depression severity. We also analyzed data at 6-month follow-up to determine whether age of onset and chronicity maintained their associations with personality. The study found that low levels of positive personality traits had unique associations with chronicity of depression, whereas elevated levels of negative personality traits had unique associations with an earlier onset of depression. Furthermore, associations were generally maintained over time, suggesting that associations between personality and these depression subtypes are stable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-483
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of nervous and mental disease
Volume197
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Independent associations between personality traits and clinical characteristics of depression.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this