Indirect effects of smoking motives on adolescent anger dysregulation and smoking

Emily R. Mischel*, Ellen W. Leen-Feldner, Ashley Arehart Knapp, Sarah A. Bilsky, Lindsay Ham, Sarah Lewis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of disease and death in the United States, and smoking typically begins in adolescence. It is therefore important to understand factors that relate to increased risk for cigarette smoking during this stage of development. Adolescence is a period when emotion regulatory capacities are still emerging and a common affective state to be regulated is anger, which adult research has linked to nicotine use. Drawing from work suggesting that negative affect reduction motives are one of the most common reasons for cigarette smoking, the current study was designed to evaluate the indirect effects of negative affect reduction motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and nicotine use within a sample of 119 treatment-seeking adolescents enrolled in group-based residential therapy. Results were generally consistent with hypotheses, suggesting significant indirect effects of negative affect reduction smoking motives on the relation between anger dysregulation and smoking outcomes. Findings are discussed in terms of negative affect reduction motives for cigarette use in the context of anger regulation among youths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1831-1838
Number of pages8
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume39
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Anger dysregulation
  • Nicotine use
  • Smoking motives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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