Le retour de la « règle indirecte »: la politique économique de l’extraction de diamants et sa relation avec l’épidémie d’Ebola dans le district de Kono, au Sierra Leone

Translated title of the contribution: Indirect rule redux: the political economy of diamond mining and its relation to the Ebola outbreak in Kono District, Sierra Leone

Raphael Frankfurter*, Mara Kardas-Nelson, Adia Benton, Mohamed Bailor Barrie, Yusupha Dibba, Paul Farmer, Eugene T. Richardson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between the 2014–2016 Ebola outbreak and the political economy of diamond mining in Kono District, Sierra Leone. The authors argue that foreign companies have recycled colonial strategies of indirect rule to facilitate the illicit flow of resources out of Sierra Leone. Drawing on field research conducted during the outbreak and in its aftermath, they show how this ‘indirect rule redux’ undermines democratic governance and the development of revenue-generation institutions. Finally, they consider the linkages between indirect rule and the Ebola outbreak, vis-à-vis the consequences of the region’s intentionally underdeveloped health care infrastructure and the scaffolding of outbreak containment onto the paramount chieftaincy system.

Translated title of the contributionIndirect rule redux: the political economy of diamond mining and its relation to the Ebola outbreak in Kono District, Sierra Leone
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)522-540
Number of pages19
JournalReview of African Political Economy
Volume45
Issue number158
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2018

Keywords

  • Ebola
  • Sierra Leone
  • diamonds
  • illicit financial flows
  • indirect rule
  • neocolonialism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

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