Individual differences in relational motives interact with the political context to produce terrorism and terrorism-support

Lotte Thomsen, Milan Obaidi, Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington, Nour Kteily, Jim Sidanius

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The psychology of suicide terrorism involves more than simply the psychology of suicide. Individual differences in social dominance orientation (SDO) interact with the socio-structural, political context to produce support for group-based dominance among members of both dominant and subordinate groups. This may help explain why, in one specific context, some people commit and endorse terrorism, whereas others do not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-378
Number of pages2
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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