Individual patterns of motor deficits evident in movement distribution analysis

Felix C. Huang, James L. Patton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies in rehabilitation have shown potential benefits of patient-initiated exploratory practice. Such findings, however, lead to new challenges in how to quantify and interpret movement patterns. We posit that changes in coordination are most evident in statistical distributions of movements. In a test on 10 chronic stroke subjects practicing for 3 days, we found that inter-quartile range of motion did not show improvement. However, a multivariate Gaussians analysis required more complexity at the end of training. Beyond simply characterizing movement, linear discriminant classification of each patient's movement distribution also identified that each patient's motor deficit left a unique signature. The greatest distinctions were observed in the space of accelerations (rather than position or velocity). These results suggest that unique deficits are best detected with such a distribution analysis, and also point to the need for customized interventions that consider such patient-specific motor deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 IEEE 13th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event2013 IEEE 13th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2013 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2013Jun 26 2013

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics
ISSN (Print)1945-7898
ISSN (Electronic)1945-7901

Other

Other2013 IEEE 13th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period6/24/136/26/13

Keywords

  • customization
  • robotic rehabilitation
  • upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Rehabilitation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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