Indolent Nonprogressive Multifocal Choroidal Lymphoid Lesions: A Clinical–Histopathological Correlation

Aliaa H. Abdelhakim, Christine A. Curcio, Lee M. Jampol, K. Bailey Freund, Ralph C. Eagle, Lawrence A. Yannuzzi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To present the clinicopathologic correlation of indolent nonprogressive multifocal choroidal lesions, clinically presumed to be lymphoid in nature, using multimodal imaging and histopathological analysis of a donor eye. Design: Case study and clinicopathological correlation. Participants: A 77-year-old man of Caucasian ancestry with indolent, nonprogressive, multifocal, choroidal infiltration of his right eye, presumed to be lymphocytic in nature based on the appearance of the lesions, was followed up for 19 years. Methods: Multimodal imaging, including fundus photography, B-scan ultrasonography, OCT, fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography, was performed throughout the 19 years of follow-up before the patient's death. The involved eye was preserved 21 hours postmortem and analyzed using standard histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of findings on multimodal imaging with histopathological and immunohistochemical findings in the involved eye. Results: Clinical examination over the course of 19 years showed no deterioration in the visual acuity of the involved eye. Multimodal imaging revealed yellow–orange choroidal lesions that showed no appreciable progression during the 19 years of follow-up. These areas stained minimally on fluorescein angiography. Indocyanine green angiography revealed tortuous choroidal vessels and fluorescence blockage. Enhanced-depth imaging OCT revealed hyporeflective, homogenous choroidal thickening. Light microscopy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry showed that the lesions were composed of small, mature-appearing B cells that spared the choriocapillaris. The findings were most consistent with extranodal marginal-zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Conclusions: Indolent, nonprogressive, multifocal, choroidal lymphoid lesions in this patient remained confined to the choroid, as determined based on the clinical examination and imaging for almost 2 decades, with no clinical evidence of extension into the retina. Light microscopy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry postmortem showed that the lesions were composed of small, mature-appearing B cells that spared the choriocapillaris. The findings were consistent with extranodal marginal-zone lymphoma of the MALT. This entity is distinct from more aggressive uveal and choroidal lymphomas and is expected to remain relatively stationary on long-term clinical follow-up, with a good visual prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOphthalmology Retina
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Clinical–histopathologic correlation
  • Multimodal imaging
  • Nonprogressive multifocal choroidal lymphoid lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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