Infection and Activation of B Cells by Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV) Leads to Autoantibody Production in an Infectious Model of Multiple Sclerosis

Young Hee Jin, Charles X. Kim, Jocelin Huang, Byung S. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease in susceptible mice that is similar to human multiple sclerosis (MS). In light of anti-CD20 therapies for MS, the susceptibility of B cells to TMEV infection is particularly important. In our study, direct viral exposure to macrophages and lymphocytes resulted in viral replication and cellular stimulation in the order of DCs, macrophages, B cells, and T cells. Notably, B cells produced viral proteins and expressed elevated levels of CD69, an activation marker. Similarly, the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in B cells was upregulated. Moreover, TMEV-infected B cells showed elevated levels of antigen-presenting function and antibody production. TMEV infection appeared to polyclonally activate B cells to produce autoantibodies and further T cell stimulation. Thus, the viral infection might potentially affect the outcome of autoimmune diseases, and/or the development of other chronic infections, including the protection and/or pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCells
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2020

Keywords

  • autoantibodies
  • demyelination
  • infectious immunity
  • multiple sclerosis
  • virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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