Inferred sex differences in status as a determinant of gender stereotypes about social influence

Alice H. Eagly*, Wendy Wood

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 3 experiments, 470 male and 425 female university students read a scenario describing a communicator's attempt to influence a recipient and then judged how much influence would occur. The scenarios in Exp I described a man trying to influence a woman or a woman trying to influence a man. For scenarios in which job titles were omitted, Ss believed that women held lower status jobs than men and that women were more likely to comply behaviorally with men than men were with women. For scenarios in which job titles were included, Ss' beliefs about compliance were based on job status rather than the sex of the stimulus persons. In Exp II, scenarios in which job titles were omitted described an influence attempt between same- or opposite-sex persons. Both the communicator's and the recipient's sex were found to contribute to the greater perceived compliance of women to men (vs men to women). In Exp III, this perceived sex difference in compliance occurred only when the communicator and recipient were employed by the same organization. (31 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-928
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

Keywords

  • inferred sex differences in status, gender stereotypes about social influence, college students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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