Inflammatory and thrombotic blood markers and walking-related disability in men and women with and without peripheral arterial disease

Mary M. McDermott*, Jack M. Guralnik, Philip Greenland, David Green, Kiang Liu, Paul M. Ridker, Cheeling Chan, Michael H. Criqui, Luigi Ferrucci, Lloyd M. Taylor, William H. Pearce, Joseph R. Schneider, Sarah I. Oskin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether higher circulating levels of thrombotic and inflammatory markers are associated with greater disability. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 346 men and women with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and 203 without PAD. MEASUREMENTS: Disability measures were the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) distance, speed, and stair-climbing scores and the 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) physical functioning score. The SF-36 and WIQ are scored on a 0 to 100 scale (100 = best). RESULTS: In persons with PAD, higher D-dimer levels were associated with lower WIQ speed scores (P < .001), lower stair-climbing scores (P < .04), and poorer SF-36 physical functioning scores (P < .01), adjusting for known and potential confounders. In participants without PAD, higher D-dimer levels were associated with lower WIQ distance scores (P < .03), lower speed scores (P < .05), and poorer SF-36 physical functioning scores (P < .02). Higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were associated with lower WIQ distance (P < .02) and speed scores (P < .001) in persons without PAD. Most of these associations were attenuated after additional adjustment for objectively measured functional limitations. CONCLUSION: Higher circulating D-dimer and hsCRP levels are associated with greater disability in walking and physical functioning in individuals with and without PAD. Physiological changes that result in walking disability may mediate these associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1888-1894
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume52
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004

Keywords

  • Ankle brachial index
  • C-reactive protein
  • D-dimer
  • Inflammation
  • Peripheral arterial disease
  • Physical functioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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