Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

Jacob A. Burns, Adam B. Weiner, William J Catalona, Eric V. Li, Edward Matthew Schaeffer, Stephen B Hanauer, Scott Arthur Strong, James Burns, Maha Hussain, Shilajit D Kundu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are limited data examining the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Objective: To compare the incidence of PCa between men with and those without IBD. Design, setting, and participants: This was a retrospective, matched-cohort study involving a single academic medical center and conducted from 1996 to 2017. Male patients with IBD (cases = 1033) were randomly matched 1:9 by age and race to men without IBD (controls = 9306). All patients had undergone at least one prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and race, evaluated the relationship between IBD and the incidence of any PCa and clinically significant PCa (Gleason grade group ≥2). A mixed-effect regression model assessed the association of IBD with PSA level. Results and limitations: PCa incidence at 10 yr was 4.4% among men with IBD and 0.65% among controls (hazard ratio [HR] 4.84 [3.34–7.02] [3.19–6.69], p < 0.001). Clinically significant PCa incidence at 10 yr was 2.4% for men with IBD and 0.42% for controls (HR 4.04 [2.52–6.48], p < 0.001). After approximately age 60, PSA values were higher among patients with IBD (fixed-effect interaction of age and patient group: p = 0.004). Results are limited by the retrospective nature of the analysis and lack of external validity. Conclusions: Men with IBD had higher rates of clinically significant PCa when compared with age- and race-matched controls. Patient summary: This study of over 10 000 men treated at a large medical center suggests that men with inflammatory bowel disease may be at a higher risk of prostate cancer than the general population. In a retrospective matched-cohort study, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who underwent prostate-specific antigen-based screening had higher rates of any and clinically significant (Gleason ≥7) prostate cancer than age- and race-matched patients without IBD. Prospective studies should investigate the relationship between IBD and prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)846-852
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean urology
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Prostatic Neoplasms
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Safety Management
Incidence
Cohort Studies
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Proportional Hazards Models
Age Groups
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Prostate-specific antigen
  • Prostatic neoplasm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

@article{0f43a79c6e174d2caeb03f30969a8885,
title = "Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Prostate Cancer",
abstract = "Background: There are limited data examining the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Objective: To compare the incidence of PCa between men with and those without IBD. Design, setting, and participants: This was a retrospective, matched-cohort study involving a single academic medical center and conducted from 1996 to 2017. Male patients with IBD (cases = 1033) were randomly matched 1:9 by age and race to men without IBD (controls = 9306). All patients had undergone at least one prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and race, evaluated the relationship between IBD and the incidence of any PCa and clinically significant PCa (Gleason grade group ≥2). A mixed-effect regression model assessed the association of IBD with PSA level. Results and limitations: PCa incidence at 10 yr was 4.4{\%} among men with IBD and 0.65{\%} among controls (hazard ratio [HR] 4.84 [3.34–7.02] [3.19–6.69], p < 0.001). Clinically significant PCa incidence at 10 yr was 2.4{\%} for men with IBD and 0.42{\%} for controls (HR 4.04 [2.52–6.48], p < 0.001). After approximately age 60, PSA values were higher among patients with IBD (fixed-effect interaction of age and patient group: p = 0.004). Results are limited by the retrospective nature of the analysis and lack of external validity. Conclusions: Men with IBD had higher rates of clinically significant PCa when compared with age- and race-matched controls. Patient summary: This study of over 10 000 men treated at a large medical center suggests that men with inflammatory bowel disease may be at a higher risk of prostate cancer than the general population. In a retrospective matched-cohort study, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who underwent prostate-specific antigen-based screening had higher rates of any and clinically significant (Gleason ≥7) prostate cancer than age- and race-matched patients without IBD. Prospective studies should investigate the relationship between IBD and prostate cancer.",
keywords = "Inflammatory bowel diseases, Prostate-specific antigen, Prostatic neoplasm",
author = "Burns, {Jacob A.} and Weiner, {Adam B.} and Catalona, {William J} and Li, {Eric V.} and Schaeffer, {Edward Matthew} and Hanauer, {Stephen B} and Strong, {Scott Arthur} and James Burns and Maha Hussain and Kundu, {Shilajit D}",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "846--852",
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Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Prostate Cancer. / Burns, Jacob A.; Weiner, Adam B.; Catalona, William J; Li, Eric V.; Schaeffer, Edward Matthew; Hanauer, Stephen B; Strong, Scott Arthur; Burns, James; Hussain, Maha; Kundu, Shilajit D.

In: European urology, Vol. 75, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 846-852.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

AU - Burns, Jacob A.

AU - Weiner, Adam B.

AU - Catalona, William J

AU - Li, Eric V.

AU - Schaeffer, Edward Matthew

AU - Hanauer, Stephen B

AU - Strong, Scott Arthur

AU - Burns, James

AU - Hussain, Maha

AU - Kundu, Shilajit D

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: There are limited data examining the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Objective: To compare the incidence of PCa between men with and those without IBD. Design, setting, and participants: This was a retrospective, matched-cohort study involving a single academic medical center and conducted from 1996 to 2017. Male patients with IBD (cases = 1033) were randomly matched 1:9 by age and race to men without IBD (controls = 9306). All patients had undergone at least one prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and race, evaluated the relationship between IBD and the incidence of any PCa and clinically significant PCa (Gleason grade group ≥2). A mixed-effect regression model assessed the association of IBD with PSA level. Results and limitations: PCa incidence at 10 yr was 4.4% among men with IBD and 0.65% among controls (hazard ratio [HR] 4.84 [3.34–7.02] [3.19–6.69], p < 0.001). Clinically significant PCa incidence at 10 yr was 2.4% for men with IBD and 0.42% for controls (HR 4.04 [2.52–6.48], p < 0.001). After approximately age 60, PSA values were higher among patients with IBD (fixed-effect interaction of age and patient group: p = 0.004). Results are limited by the retrospective nature of the analysis and lack of external validity. Conclusions: Men with IBD had higher rates of clinically significant PCa when compared with age- and race-matched controls. Patient summary: This study of over 10 000 men treated at a large medical center suggests that men with inflammatory bowel disease may be at a higher risk of prostate cancer than the general population. In a retrospective matched-cohort study, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who underwent prostate-specific antigen-based screening had higher rates of any and clinically significant (Gleason ≥7) prostate cancer than age- and race-matched patients without IBD. Prospective studies should investigate the relationship between IBD and prostate cancer.

AB - Background: There are limited data examining the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Objective: To compare the incidence of PCa between men with and those without IBD. Design, setting, and participants: This was a retrospective, matched-cohort study involving a single academic medical center and conducted from 1996 to 2017. Male patients with IBD (cases = 1033) were randomly matched 1:9 by age and race to men without IBD (controls = 9306). All patients had undergone at least one prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and race, evaluated the relationship between IBD and the incidence of any PCa and clinically significant PCa (Gleason grade group ≥2). A mixed-effect regression model assessed the association of IBD with PSA level. Results and limitations: PCa incidence at 10 yr was 4.4% among men with IBD and 0.65% among controls (hazard ratio [HR] 4.84 [3.34–7.02] [3.19–6.69], p < 0.001). Clinically significant PCa incidence at 10 yr was 2.4% for men with IBD and 0.42% for controls (HR 4.04 [2.52–6.48], p < 0.001). After approximately age 60, PSA values were higher among patients with IBD (fixed-effect interaction of age and patient group: p = 0.004). Results are limited by the retrospective nature of the analysis and lack of external validity. Conclusions: Men with IBD had higher rates of clinically significant PCa when compared with age- and race-matched controls. Patient summary: This study of over 10 000 men treated at a large medical center suggests that men with inflammatory bowel disease may be at a higher risk of prostate cancer than the general population. In a retrospective matched-cohort study, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who underwent prostate-specific antigen-based screening had higher rates of any and clinically significant (Gleason ≥7) prostate cancer than age- and race-matched patients without IBD. Prospective studies should investigate the relationship between IBD and prostate cancer.

KW - Inflammatory bowel diseases

KW - Prostate-specific antigen

KW - Prostatic neoplasm

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