Inflammatory diseases of the heart

Mary E. McBride, Paul A. Checchia*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The inflammatory diseases of the heart contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of our pediatric patients. This chapter focuses on the disease processes of infective endocarditis, Kawasaki disease and myocarditis as well as their respective management. Endocarditis is a rare diagnosis in pediatrics and those with congenital heart disease particularly with prosthetic material and residual lesions resulting in turbulent blood flow are at particular risk. Management is long-term courses with combination antimicrobials. Complications are not rare and surgical intervention is often employed. Kawasaki disease is prevalent in the pediatric population and while self-limited in nature, can result in life-threatening coronary aneurysms and stenoses. A high-index of suspicion is often necessary to diagnose these children. Intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin are the mainstays of therapy. Long-term, these patients need to be monitored closely for coronary complications. Myocarditis causes cardiac dysfunction and can result in a cardiogenic shock and circulatory collapse. It can also progress to a dilated cardiomyopathy. Myocarditis is caused most commonly by viruses but also other infectious agents, drugs and systemic illness can be the culprit. Treatment is largely supportive with use of inotropic agents and other heart failure medications. Mechanical circulatory support is often employed. Some of these patients will ultimately require cardiac transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRespiratory, Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems
PublisherSpringer Verlag London Ltd
Pages467-481
Number of pages15
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9781447163565
ISBN (Print)1447163559, 9781447163558
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Endocarditis
  • Kawasaki disease
  • Myocarditis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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