Influence of dedicated heart failure clinics on delivery of recommended therapies in outpatient cardiology practices: Findings from the Registry to Improve the Use of Evidence-Based Heart Failure Therapies in the Outpatient Setting (IMPROVE HF)

Nancy M. Albert*, Gregg C. Fonarow, Clyde W. Yancy, Anne B. Curtis, Wendy Gattis Stough, Mihai Gheorghiade, J. Thomas Heywood, Mark McBride, Mandeep R. Mehra, Christopher M. O'Connor, Dwight Reynolds, Mary Norine Walsh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: National guidelines recommend heart failure (HF) disease management programs to facilitate adherence to evidence-based practices. This study examined the influence of dedicated HF clinics on delivery of guideline-recommended therapies for cardiology practice outpatients with HF and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Methods: IMPROVE HF, a prospective cohort study, enrolled 167 cardiology practices to characterize outpatient management of 15,381 patients with chronic systolic HF. Adherence to guideline-recommended HF therapies was recorded, and the presence of a dedicated HF clinic was assessed by survey. Multivariate models identified contributions to delivery of guideline-recommended HF therapies. Results: Of practices, 41.3% had a dedicated HF clinic. Practices with a dedicated HF clinic had greater adherence to 3 of 7 guideline-recommended HF therapy measures: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (P = .02), β-blocker (P = .025), and HF education (P = .009). After adjustment, use of a dedicated HF clinic was associated with greater conformity in 2 of 7 measures: cardiac resynchronization therapy (P = .036) and HF education (P = .005) but not angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, β-blocker, aldosterone antagonist, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, and anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: Use of dedicated HF clinics varied in cardiology outpatient practices and was associated with greater use of cardiac resynchronization therapy and HF education but not other guideline-recommended therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-244
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume159
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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