Influence of systolic blood pressure and body mass index on left ventricular structure in healthy African-American and white young adults: The CARDIA study

Richard Lorber, Samuel S. Gidding, Martha L. Daviglus*, Laura A. Colangelo, Kiang Liu, Julius M. Gardin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study comprised of a generally healthy, biracial cohort of 28- to 40-year-old adults, we sought to characterize the distribution of left ventricular (LV) mass and LV geometry and the relationship of systolic blood pressure (SBP), body mass index (BMI), and fasting insulin to LV mass and geometry. BACKGROUND: Left ventricular mass is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Two-dimensionally guided M-mode echocardiograms were used to calculate LV mass index (g/height2.7) and geometry. RESULTS: Black men had highest LV mass index followed by white men, black women, and white women. Blacks had higher LV wall thickness/diameter ratios than whites. Left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 2% of the cohort. Going from highest to lowest quartile for LV mass index and LV wall thickness/diameter ratio, SBP and BMI were highest in those with the highest LV mass index and LV wall thickness/diameter ratio. Increasing BMI and SBP over a 10-year interval was also strongly related to LV structure in most race/gender groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a generally healthy young adult cohort, LV structure as defined by LV mass and geometry is associated with SBP and BMI at levels generally considered normal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-960
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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