Influenza and bacterial pneumonia - constant companions

Richard G Wunderink*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sequential or concomitant influenza and bacterial pneumonia are two common syndromes seen in community-acquired pneumonia. Inadequacies of diagnostic testing make separating simple pneumonia with either bacteria or influenza from concomitant or sequential influenza with both microorganisms difficult, although the novel 2009 H1N1 epidemic may improve the availability of molecular testing for viruses. Given the frequency of viral pneumonia and diagnostic limitations, empirical antivirals may be underutilized in community-acquired pneumonia. Thankfully, increasingly effective vaccines appear to disrupt this synergistic relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number150
JournalCritical Care
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 13 2010

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Bacterial Pneumonia
Human Influenza
Pneumonia
Viral Pneumonia
Antiviral Agents
Vaccines
Viruses
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Influenza and bacterial pneumonia - constant companions",
abstract = "Sequential or concomitant influenza and bacterial pneumonia are two common syndromes seen in community-acquired pneumonia. Inadequacies of diagnostic testing make separating simple pneumonia with either bacteria or influenza from concomitant or sequential influenza with both microorganisms difficult, although the novel 2009 H1N1 epidemic may improve the availability of molecular testing for viruses. Given the frequency of viral pneumonia and diagnostic limitations, empirical antivirals may be underutilized in community-acquired pneumonia. Thankfully, increasingly effective vaccines appear to disrupt this synergistic relationship.",
author = "Wunderink, {Richard G}",
year = "2010",
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doi = "10.1186/cc8974",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
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Influenza and bacterial pneumonia - constant companions. / Wunderink, Richard G.

In: Critical Care, Vol. 14, No. 3, 150, 13.05.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influenza and bacterial pneumonia - constant companions

AU - Wunderink, Richard G

PY - 2010/5/13

Y1 - 2010/5/13

N2 - Sequential or concomitant influenza and bacterial pneumonia are two common syndromes seen in community-acquired pneumonia. Inadequacies of diagnostic testing make separating simple pneumonia with either bacteria or influenza from concomitant or sequential influenza with both microorganisms difficult, although the novel 2009 H1N1 epidemic may improve the availability of molecular testing for viruses. Given the frequency of viral pneumonia and diagnostic limitations, empirical antivirals may be underutilized in community-acquired pneumonia. Thankfully, increasingly effective vaccines appear to disrupt this synergistic relationship.

AB - Sequential or concomitant influenza and bacterial pneumonia are two common syndromes seen in community-acquired pneumonia. Inadequacies of diagnostic testing make separating simple pneumonia with either bacteria or influenza from concomitant or sequential influenza with both microorganisms difficult, although the novel 2009 H1N1 epidemic may improve the availability of molecular testing for viruses. Given the frequency of viral pneumonia and diagnostic limitations, empirical antivirals may be underutilized in community-acquired pneumonia. Thankfully, increasingly effective vaccines appear to disrupt this synergistic relationship.

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U2 - 10.1186/cc8974

DO - 10.1186/cc8974

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 14

JO - Critical Care

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M1 - 150

ER -