Inside thoughts and outside influences: Cognitive vulnerability moderates the effect of decreases in perceived social support on depressive symptoms

Gerald J. Haeffel, Amanda R. Mathew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A three time-point longitudinal design was used to investigate the relationship among aversive interpersonal behaviors (self-reported reassurance seeking and negative feedback seeking), cognitive vulnerability, perceived social support, and depressive and anxious symptoms. There were two primary hypotheses: (a) negative interpersonal behaviors would lead to decreases in perceived social support, and (b) a perceived loss of social support would lead to future depressive symptoms for those with high, but not low, levels of cognitive vulnerability. Consistent with hypotheses, results showed that negative feedback seeking predicted decreases in perceived social support. Individuals who experienced a loss of perceived social support were most likely to exhibit an increase in depressive symptoms if they had high levels of cognitive vulnerability. This pattern of results was specific to depressive, but not anxious symptoms. The theoretical and therapeutic implications of the results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-300
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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