Integral membrane protein 2 of Epstein-barr virus regulates reactivation from latency through dominant negative effects on protein-tyrosine kinases

Cheryl L. Miller*, Anne L. Burkhardt, Jennifer H. Lee, Becky Stealey, Richard Longnecker, Joseph B. Bolen, Elliott Kieff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

261 Scopus citations

Abstract

An Epstein-Barr virus-encoded protein, LMP2, blocks the effects of surface immunoglobulin (slg) cross-linking on calcium mobilization and on lytic reactivation of EBV in latently infected and growth-transformed primary human B lymphocytes. In wild-type EBV-transformed cells, LMP2 is constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated and is associated with Lyn and Syk protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs). Baseline Lyn PTK activity is substantially reduced, and slg cross-linking fails to activate Lyn, Syk, P13-K, PLCγ2, Vav, Shc, and MAPK. Syk, P13-K, PLCγ2, and Vav are constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated, and their tyrosine phosphorylation does not change following sIg cross-linking. In contrast, cross-linking sIg on cells transformed by LMP2 null mutant EBV recombinants triggers the same protein tyrosine kinase cascade as in noninfected B lymphocytes. These data are consistent with a model in which LMP2 is a constitutive dominant negative modulator of slg receptor signaling through its effects on Lyn, Syk, or regulators of these kinases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-166
Number of pages12
JournalImmunity
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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