Integrated semiconductor optical sensors for chronic, minimally-invasive imaging of brain function

Thomas T. Lee*, Ofer Levi, Cang Jianhua, Megumi Kaneko, Michael P. Stryker, Stephen J. Smith, Krishna V. Shenoy, James S. Harris

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intrinsic Optical Signal (IOS) imaging is a widely accepted technique for imaging brain activity. We propose an integrated device consisting of interleaved arrays of gallium arsenide (GaAs) based semiconductor light sources and detectors operating at telecommunications wavelengths in the near-infrared. Such a device will allow for long-term, minimally invasive monitoring of neural activity in freely behaving subjects, and will enable the use of structured illumination patterns to improve system performance. In this work we describe the proposed system and show that near-infrared IOS imaging at wavelengths compatible with semiconductor devices can produce physiologically significant images in mice, even through skull.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
Pages1025-1028
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Event28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2006Sep 3 2006

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

Other28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period8/30/069/3/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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