INTEGRATIVE PROBLEM‐CENTERED THERAPY: TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF FAMILY AND INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOTHERAPIES

William M. Pinsof*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emerging from the growing trend toward integration in the field of psychotherapy, Integrative Problem‐Centered Therapy (IPCT) provides a model for applying different modalities (individual and family) and orientations (behavioral, communicational and psychodynamic) to the broad range of problems patients bring to psychotherapy. Based on the assumption that each modality and orientation possesses its own domain of expertise, IPCT attempts to interrelate the major modalities and orientations to maximize their strengths and minimize their weaknesses. The goal is to create a maximally effective and efficient problem‐centered psychotherapy. This paper presents an overview of IPCT, delineating its core principles and premises as well as the basic methodological steps in IPCT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-35
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Marital and Family Therapy
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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