Integrin suppresses neurogenesis and regulates brain tissue assembly in planarian regeneration

Nicolle A. Bonar, Christian P. Petersen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Animals capable of adult regeneration require specific signaling to control injury-induced cell proliferation, specification and patterning, but comparatively little is known about how the regeneration blastema assembles differentiating cells into well-structured functional tissues. Using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea as a model, we identify β1-integrin as a crucial regulator of blastema architecture. β1-integrin(RNAi) animals formed small head blastemas with severe tissue disorganization, including ectopic neural spheroids containing differentiated neurons normally found in distinct organs. By mimicking aspects of normal brain architecture but without normal cell-type regionalization, these spheroids bore a resemblance to mammalian tissue organoids synthesized in vitro. We identified one of four planarian integrin-alpha subunits inhibition of which phenocopied these effects, suggesting that a specific receptor controls brain organization through regeneration. Neoblast stem cells and progenitor cells were mislocalized in β1-integrin(RNAi) animals without significantly altered body-wide patterning. Furthermore, tissue disorganization phenotypes were most pronounced in animals undergoing brain regeneration and not homeostatic maintenance or regeneration-induced remodeling of the brain. These results suggest that integrin signaling ensures proper progenitor recruitment after injury, enabling the generation of largescale tissue organization within the regeneration blastema.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)784-794
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopment (Cambridge)
Volume144
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Keywords

  • Blastema
  • Brain regeneration
  • Integrin
  • Morphogenesis
  • Organoids
  • Planaria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology

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