Intentional injury management and prevention in pediatric practice: Results from 1998 and 2003 American Academy of Pediatrics periodic surveys

Matthew J. Trowbridge, Robert D. Sege*, Lynn Olson, Karen O'Connor, Emalee Flaherty, Howard Spivak

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. Intentional injuries are significant causes of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the United States. A 1998 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) survey identified child abuse, domestic violence, and community violence as concerns for pediatricians, although the majority of pediatricians also reported feeling unprepared to manage these issues. A second AAP survey in 2003 analyzed trends in pediatrician experience and attitudes related to these issues. Methods. Surveys were sent to national random samples of AAP members in 1998 (n = 1629) and 2003 (n = 1603); response rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. Surveys measured pediatrician experience in the past 12 months in managing injuries caused by child abuse, domestic violence, and community violence. Attitudes regarding available resources and adequacy of training about intentional injury management were also collected. Trends between surveys were analyzed using χ2 analysis. Results. The proportion of pediatricians who reported treatment of intentional injuries increased between surveys. The percentage of pediatricians who indicated that screening for domestic violence and community violence risk should be included in routine health visits increased from 66% to 72% and 71% to 77%, respectively. Confidence in ability to identify and manage injuries that were caused by domestic violence and community violence increased but remained low, whereas the proportion of pediatricians who expressed confidence in ability to identify child abuse decreased (65% vs 60%). Conclusions. Despite overall improvement in acceptance of intentional injury prevention in routine care as well as confidence in intentional injury management, pediatrician confidence to identify and manage intentional injuries remains low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)996-1000
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume116
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Health services research
  • Intentional injury
  • Office screening
  • Pediatrics
  • Violence prevention
  • Violence screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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