Interaction of CD38 variant and chronic interpersonal stress prospectively predicts social anxiety and depression symptoms over 6 years

Benjamin A. Tabak*, Suzanne Vrshek-Schallhorn, Richard E. Zinbarg, Jason M. Prenoveau, Susan Mineka, Eva E. Redei, Emma K. Adam, Michelle G. Craske

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Variation in the CD38 gene, which regulates secretion of the neuropeptide oxytocin, has been associated with several social phenotypes. Specifically, rs3796863 A allele carriers have demonstrated increased social sensitivity. In 400 older adolescents, we used trait-state-occasion modeling to investigate how rs3796863 genotype, baseline ratings of chronic interpersonal stress, and their gene–environment (G×E) interaction predicted trait social anxiety and depression symptoms over 6 years. We found significant G×E effects for CD38 A-carrier genotypes and chronic interpersonal stress at baseline predicting greater social anxiety and depression symptoms. A significant G×E effect of smaller magnitude was also found for C/C genotype and chronic interpersonal stress predicting greater depression; however, this effect was small compared with the main effect of chronic interpersonal stress. Thus, in the context of chronic interpersonal stress, heightened social sensitivity associated with the rs3796863 A allele may prospectively predict risk for social anxiety and (to a lesser extent) depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-27
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Psychological Science
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • CD38
  • Depression
  • Gene–environment interaction
  • Interpersonal stress
  • Oxytocin
  • Social anxiety
  • Trait-state-occasion modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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