Interferon regulatory factor 6 promotes cell cycle arrest and is regulated by the proteasome in a cell cycle-dependent manner

Caleb M. Bailey, Daniel E. Abbott, Naira V. Margaryan, Zhila Khalkhali-Ellis*, Mary J.C. Hendrix

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) is a novel and unique member of the IRF family of transcription factors. IRF6 has not been linked to the regulatory pathways or functions associated with other IRF family members, and the regulation and function of IRF6 remain unknown. We recently identified a protein interaction between IRF6 and the tumor suppressor maspin. To gain insight into the biological significance of the maspin-IRF6 interaction, we examined the regulation and function of IRF6 in relation to maspin in normal mammary epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that in quiescent cells, IRF6 exists primarily in a non-phosphorylated state. However, cellular proliferation leads to rapid IRF6 phosphorylation, resulting in proteasome-dependent IRF6 degradation. These data are supported in situ by the increased expression of IRF6 in quiescent, differentiated lobuloalveolar cells of the lactating mammary gland compared to its expression in proliferating ductal and glandular epithelial cells during pregnancy. Furthermore, the reexpression of IRF6 in breast cancer cells results in cell cycle arrest, and the presence of maspin augments this response. These data support a model in which IRF6, in collaboration with maspin, promotes mammary epithelial cell differentiation by facilitating entry into the G0 phase of the cell cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2235-2243
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular and cellular biology
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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