Intermediate filament dynamic response to shear stress in living endothelial cells

B. P. Helmke*, R. D. Goldman, P. F. Davies

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Adaptation of the endothelial cytoskeleton to an altered hemodynamic environment has been detected using indirect fluorescence labeling in fixed cells, but acute changes in cytoskeletal movement may play a role in rapid flow-mediated signaling by redistribution of forces to remote sites in the cell. For the first time, access to the dynamics of the cytoskeleton in living cells is possible by using chimeric constructs of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Endothelial cells expressing GFP-vimentin were exposed to unidirectional steady laminar shear stress in a parallel plate flow chamber. Deconvolution of fluorescence optical sections generated a precise 3-D spatial description of the corresponding intermediate filament (IF) network. IF motion was rapidly altered in regions of the cell after a step change in shear stress applied to the lumenal surface. A bioengineering analysis of real time cytoskeletal dynamics in living cells suggests a complex integration of biomechanics with spatial organization of intracellular signaling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume1
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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